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Street Views

The story behind Rue Sherbrooke

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Photo: Wikimedia Common Domain
Rue Sherbrooke, also referred to as Côte Sherbrooke, is named in honour of Sir John Coape Sherbrooke (1764-1830). After serving with the British army in Nova Scotia, the Netherlands, India, the Mediterranean (including Sicily) and Spain, Sherbrooke was appointed Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia in 1811.

The story behind Rue de Stadaconé

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Photo: Bill Cox
Rue de Stadaconé (Stadacona in English) was named after the 16th-century Iroquois village on the shore of the St. Charles River in the Limoilou district of present Quebec City. 

The story behind Chemin Sainte-Foy

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Photo: Bill Cox
The origin of the name of this busy thoroughfare has various hypotheses.

The story behind Rue Stanley

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Photo: Bill Cox
Rue Stanley is named in honour of Sir Henry Morton Stanley (1841-1904) who was born John Rowlands. He was famous for his exploration of central Africa and his search for missionary and explorer David Livingstone. 

The story behind Avenue Sarah

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Photo: Bill Cox

Avenue Sarah was named in honour of Sarah Maxfield, the mother of the prosperous timber merchant and businessman William Sheppard, who owned Woodfield estate in Sillery. Sheppard also honoured his mother by naming one of his sons Maxfield.

The story behind Rue Richard-Burke

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Photo: Bill Cox
Rue Richard-Burke is named in honour of Richard Burke, who was born in New Ross, Wexford County, Ireland, in about 1834. In 1853 he was working as a stevedore at the Port of Quebec. In 1855, with other Irishmen he founded the Quebec Ship Labourers’ Benevolent Society to provide financial aid to workmen who had been injured at the Port of Quebec. 

Street views: The story behind the name of Rue de la Terrasse-Stuart

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Photo: Wikipedia Commons
Rue de la Terrasse-Stuart is a short street near Avenue Maguire in Sillery, and is named for George Okill Stuart, Jr., lawyer, politician and judge. Born in Toronto, he was the son of the Reverend George Okill Stuart, an Anglican priest, and Lucy Brooks. 
 
Stuart became the first English-speaking mayor of Quebec City.
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