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Street Views

The story behind Rue du Tracel

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Photo: Bill Cox
This street is named after the large train trestle (tracel in French) bridge that spans the Cap-Rouge River valley at the entrance of the Plage Jacques-Cartier. 

The story behind Rue Treggett

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Photo: Bill Cox
Rue Treggett is named after four generations of the Treggett family who, from 1865 to 2014, oversaw the administration of Mount Hermon Cemetery. 

The story of Avenue Thomas

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Photo: Bill Cox

Avenue Thomas is named in memory of Thomas McInenly, the eldest son of the successful Sillery wood merchant and land-owner Patrick McInenly, who in 1832 had purchased land in the Jesuits Seigneurie just west of Côte de Sillery.

Rue Patrick-McGrath

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Photo: Bill Cox

This street is named in honour of Patrick McGrath, who was born in Quebec in 1858. He was the son of Timothy McGrath and Mary Ann Walsh from Ireland. In 1881 he worked as a servant for the O’Farrell’s. Three years later he married their daughter Margaret in the parish of Saint-Charles-Borromée in Charlesbourg, near Quebec City.

The story behind Rue d’Ottawa

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Photo: Bill Cox
Rue d’Ottawa is named after Canada’s capital city in Ontario, located along the Ottawa River where Samuel de Champlain established a camp in the early 17th century. The camp was used as a stopover for travellers, merchants and explorers heading to Lake Huron, via Lake Nipissing and Georgian Bay. By 1815, a small community was established.

The story behind Rue du Marché-Finlay

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Photo: Bill Cox
Rue du Marché-Finlay is named after the merchant William Finlay who played a leading role in the business world of Quebec City in the 19th century. Possibly a native of Kilmarnock, Scotland, he arrived in Quebec sometime between 1798 and 1805 and by 1808, he was working for the powerful merchant John Mure.

The story behind Rue Mary-Travers

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Photo: Bill Cox
This street was named in honour of Mary Rose-Anna Travers (1894-1941). A legendary Quebec singer/songwriter known as “La Bolduc.” Born in Newport on the Gaspé coast, her father Lawrence Travers was of Irish descent and her mother was a French-Canadian Mi’kmaq.  

The story behind Rue de la Belle-Angélique

Street Views:

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Photo: Shirley Nadeau
Normally, Bill Cox prepares the weekly “Street Views” column, but because I have an unusual connection to the person after whom this new street in Charlesbourg is named, I felt I had to write a “view” of this particular one.

Rue Richard-Turner

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Photo: from Wikipedia Public Domain
Rue Richard-Turner is named in honour of Sir Richard Ernest William Turner. Born into a prominent Quebec City business family, he worked at his father’s grocery and lumber business, rising to partner before the Great War. He later took over the business when he returned from the War. 

The story behind Rue de la Ristigouche

Street Views:

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Photo: Bill Cox
Rue de la Ristigouche is named after the Restigouche River (Ristigouche in French) that flows into the Baie des Chaleurs near Campbellton in northeastern New Brunswick and Dalhousie in Quebec. The river is part of the border between the two provinces. 
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