Street Views

The story behind Chemin du Foulon

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikipedia Commons - Public Domain

This road is named after the foulon (fulling mill) where wool was treated to produce a heavy homespun cloth.

The story behind Rue Faucher

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This street is named in honour of Narcisse-Henri-Édouard Faucher, who was born in Quebec City on March 24, 1848. He studied at the Petit Séminaire de Québec and at Collège de Sainte-Anne-de-la-Pocatière.

The story behind Rue Eugène-Chinic

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

Guillaume-Eugène Chinic (1818-1889) was born in Quebec City. At a very early age, probably around 15, he began working for François-Xavier Méthot, who owned a hardware store on Rue Saint-Pierre. Méthot also ran a nail factory, a putty factory and a millstone factory.

In 1844 Chinic married Marie-Anne Leblond of Montreal. They had 12 children, only six of whom survived to adulthood.

The story behind Rue Escoffier

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

Georges-Auguste Escoffier (1846-1935), was a French culinary artist known as the “king of chefs and the chef of kings.” He earned a worldwide reputation as director of the kitchens at the Savoy Hotel (1890-99) and later at the Carlton Hotel, both in London. His name is synonymous with classic French cuisine.

The story behind Avenue Ernest-Gagnon

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This street was named in honour of Ernest Gagnon (1834-1915), folklorist, teacher, administrator and historian. Born in Louiseville, he was from a prominent family of Quebec City musicians.

The story behind Rue Émile-Boiteau

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Collection iconographique de la Ville de Québec

This street was named to honour Émile Boiteau, who was born in Quebec City on April 28, 1898, the son of Joseph Boiteau, a grocer, and Malvina Marois.

The story behind Rue Élisabeth-Couc

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Native-Americans.org

This street is named after a rather mysterious woman named Élisabeth Couc (1667- circa 1750) sometimes called Isabelle. She was the daughter of Pierre Couc, dit Lafleur, and Marie Miteoamegoukoué, an Algonquin Christian, and was probably born at Trois-Rivières. Like her first name and place of birth, the details about her early years are uncertain.

The story behind Rue Eiffel

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This street is named in honour of Gustave Eiffel (1832-1923), a French civil engineer who made his name building various bridges for the French railway network, most famously the Garabit viaduct.

The story behind Earl Grey Terrace

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain: Library and Archives Canada, C-030723

This terrace on the Plains of Abraham, overlooking the St. Lawrence River, is named in honour of Sir Albert Henry George Grey, the fourth Earl Grey. Born in London, England, in 1851, he was Governor General of Canada from 1904 to 1911. He died in 1917.

The story behind Autoroute Duplessis

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This highway is named for Maurice Le Noblet Duplessis (1890-1959), the 16th premier of Quebec, from 1936 to 1939 and from 1944 to 1959.

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