Street Views

The story behind Avenue, Allée, Jardin and Promenade des Gouverneurs

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Thaddée Lebel, circa 1930, Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

Two streets, a garden and a promenade are reminders that Quebec City was the location of the official residences of lieutenant-governors of Quebec and governors general of Canada for more than 100 years, and of French colonial governors centuries earlier.

The story behind Rue Jordi-Bonet

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This street and a nearby park are named in honour of painter, engraver, ceramist and sculptor Jordi Bonet (1932-1979), who was born in Barcelona, Spain.

At the age of seven, Bonet lost his right arm in an accident. Art then became his refuge. At age 20, he already owned his own studio and exhibited with much older artists.

The story behind Avenue Joseph-Vézina

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This street is named in honour of Joseph Vézina (1848-1924), a conductor, composer, organist and music professor who was born in Quebec City. His first music teacher was his father, François Vézina, a house painter and amateur musician, who taught him to play the piano.

The story behind Rue Jovette-Bernier

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This street is named in honour of Jovette-Alice Bernier (1900-81), a journalist and writer, born in Saint-Fabien-de-Rimouski. Because of the extensive exposure she received in print media and on the radio, she was often referred to simply as “Jovette.”

The story behind Rue Jean-Jacques Bertrand

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This street is named in honour of Jean-Jacques Bertrand, who was the 21st premier of Quebec from 1968 to 1970. A native of Sainte-Agathe-des-Monts, he was a member of the legislative assembly for the riding of Missisquoi from 1948 until his death in 1973.

The story behind Place Jean-Pelletier

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Shirley Nadeau from QCT archives

This park is named in honour of Jean Pelletier (1935-2009), the 37th mayor of Quebec City (1977-89).

The story behind Jardin Jean-Paul-L’Allier

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

It is a garden rather than a street that honours the memory of Jean-Paul L’Allier (1938- 2016), the 38th mayor of Quebec City from 1989 to 2005.

STREET VIEWS: The story behind Rue Jeanne-Sauvé

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Photo: Canadian Stamp News

This street is named in honour of Jeanne (née Benoit) Sauvé (1922-1993), who was the 23rd Governor General of Canada from 1984 to 1990. Born in Saskatchewan, she studied at the University of Ottawa and worked for the federal government as a translator in order to pay her tuition.

The story behind Boulevard Jean-Lesage

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This wide boulevard is named in honour of Jean Lesage (1912-1980). Born in Montreal, Lesage was a lawyer who served as the 19th premier of Quebec from 1960 to 1966.

The story behind Rue Jean-Brillant

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This street honours Jean Baptiste Arthur Brillant (1890-1918), who was born in Routhierville in the Lower Saint Lawrence region. One of the bravest Canadian officers during the First World War, Brillant was awarded the Victoria Cross (VC), the most prestigious award for gallantry that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

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